We change lives by saving sight. Join us!

Saving Sight is a nonprofit organization that changes lives through the gift of sight and charitable vision services. We were founded in 1960 as an eye bank in central Missouri, and today, our vision programs serve more than 100,000 people worldwide each year. We strive to be the global partnership model for how eye banking and charitable vision services can most effectively serve people and communities.

KidSight Vision Screening Program

KidSight

Our trained technicians have conducted more than 500,000 vision screenings for Missouri children since 1995. Using a photoscreening device, we quickly and noninvasively screen children ages 6 months to 6 years old for common causes of childhood vision loss free of charge, and we refer at-risk children to eye doctors for examination and treatment.

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Eye Donation

Since 1960, Saving Sight has coordinated eye donation and the distribution of corneas for transplant. Today, we operate in Missouri, Kansas, and central Illinois, and we distribute corneas to transplant surgeons in those states, the rest of the U.S., and around the world to help people receive the precious gift of sight.
 

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Eyeglass Recycling

Our Eyeglass Recycling Program changes lives locally and globally. We collaborate with the Missouri Lions to collect used eyeglasses, prepare them for recycling, and provide them to people in need, free of charge.

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A Father Continues Helping Others Through the Gift of Sight

James smiles in family photo. He was able to provide others the gift of sight as an eye donor.James enjoyed woodworking and watching NASCAR and NHRA drag races. “But above all, he was a man all about his family,” said his daughter Melissa. “He was the type of man that would give you the shirt off his back and do without so others didn’t have to.”

When James passed away suddenly at age 61, his family knew saying yes to eye donation was something he would have wanted. “The opportunity was presented to us just after my dad’s passing,” said Melissa. “Of course any decision in those moments is hard but, for us, it was a case of knowing my dad would have done it in a heartbeat because it was his way of helping someone.”


Concord Eyeglass Ministry Changes Lives Through Recycled Eyeglasses

Group photo of Larry Merry, the Concord Eyeglass Ministry team and local helpers at the clinic in Oaxaca, Mexico on April 21, 2017.The Concord Eyeglass Ministry out of Jefferson City, Missouri serves others and changes lives by saving sight through multiple mission trips to Mexico a year. Saving Sight provides recycled glasses to the team through our Eyeglass Recycling Program to help connect underserved people in these areas with access to corrective lenses. Most recently, the Concord Eyeglass Ministry visited the state of Veracruz, Mexico in April for a three day clinic in a rural village in Oaxaca. Over 400 people came to the clinic in hopes of restoring their vision with glasses.


Researchers One Step Closer to Finding New Treatment for Myopia

Kansas City, Mo. (May 11, 2017) – The millions projected to be diagnosed with myopia, or nearsightedness, in the coming years may soon have an option other than corrective eyewear or refractive surgery to restore their vision. According to new research presented this week at the Annual Meeting of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO), scientists are one step closer to developing a molecular treatment that could slow development of the condition.  

The project, led by Jody Summers, PhD, professor of cell biology at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, successfully isolated cells in the choroid of both chick and human eyes which have been found to produce the enzyme retinaldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (RALDH2). Previous research by Dr. Summers and her team demonstrated RALDH2 to be important in controlling scleral matrix remodeling. Isolation of the cells which produce the enzyme will allow future projects to identify the cells’ type and pursue development of molecular treatments that target the cells to control overall growth of the eye.